The end of an affair (with a robin)

Never lose your heart to a wild creature: it will always end in tears.

Charlot was born in the neighbourhood of our garden in the spring of 2014. We’ve followed his progress through all the important stages of his life. He was fledged and had his first feeding rituals in our garden. When he grew to adulthood and displayed his fine red breast, he fended off all rivals and established himself as the ruling genius. We were there for his courtship the following spring and his first brood; we provided food and advice when his moult began while he was still feeding his youngsters; we saw him fall in love again the next spring, and his two new babes were fed on our patio.

His favourite resting places were those where he could catch our attention: on the laburnum or apple tree, looking directly in at the kitchen sink; the bench from which he could view the kitchen table; and the handle of the French door where he could peck the glass for attention. Outside, he liked the fuschia next to the stone bench, and he had his own concrete column for feeding.

The garden provided most of his nutrition, but his favourite special treat was mild white cheddar cheese, which he consumed in vast quantities. First thing in the morning, even before I was dressed, he arrived to beg for cheese. He even offered it as a gourmet dish to his lady friend.

Disaster struck this spring when a strange new robin turned up and decided that this would be his territory. We looked on helplessly as the fight for domination played out for several weeks. We patiently explained that we could accommodate both, but neither would listen. Charlot was gradually forced back across the garden until he held only a small section near the bench. After a dreadful aerial battle Charlot moved out and ceded the territory. He sneaked back a few times in the following days but the neighbourhood bully kept a sharp watch. We were devastated, but could not intervene in nature’s ways. The aggressor has moved on, but Charlot has not returned.

It is now midsummer and an adolescent robin has arrived on his own, without parents or siblings. He has not developed his red breast yet, but he is making himself quite at home.

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